Articles Posted in Nursing Home News

Nursing homes continue to be hit hard by the coronavirus. Across the U.S., over 40 percent of deaths in the country are linked to nursing homes. In Maryland nursing homes, the numbers are even higher. As of September 25, there have been 2,146 deaths across the state in nursing homes, group homes, and assisted living facilities, which accounts for 57% of the total deaths in the state. Maryland has seen 753 resident deaths and 7 staff deaths during the week of September 23.

According to a recent news report, one nursing home in Sykesville, Maryland is facing hundreds of dollars in fines after the state found it failed to isolate residents and notify staff during an outbreak. For example, the facility moved an exposed resident to a room with a negative resident, who both later tested positive. Some newly admitted residents also were not isolated, despite having sufficient rooms to do so. Maryland nursing home residents may be able to take action against the facility based on its failure to protect and properly care for residents.

Other states have explored solutions to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in long-term care facilities. As one news source reported, in New Mexico, the state worked with a healthcare operator to set up a nursing home that it dedicated to treating long-term care patients infected with the coronavirus. It was set up to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in long-term care facilities in the state. Deaths in nursing homes in New Mexico make up 34% of the total deaths in the state.

When someone is searching for a Maryland nursing home to place a loved one, it’s likely that a facility’s status as for-profit or non-profit is not high on the list of priorities. Typically, the difficult decision of where to place a loved one who needs part- or full-time care is made based on location, price, and the services offered. Many families may not even think to look into the for- or non-profit status of the facility, instead prioritizing finding a place nearby where their loved one feels safe, or perhaps even knows people already there.

However, a recent study might make Maryland families rethink their priorities when searching for a nursing home. According to the study, senior residents in for-profit nursing homes are almost two times as likely to have health problems linked to poor care, compared to those living in non-profit  homes. Additionally, among residents studied at for-profit homes, there were more clinical signs of neglect, such as dehydration in clients with feeding tubes, broken catheters, bedsores, and improperly managed medications.

The leading researcher in charge of the study believes the results show that more oversight is needed in nursing homes, especially for-profit homes. However, the U.S. government is currently considering rolling back existing regulations meant to protect nursing home residents. The existing regulations were put into place to improve resident safety and well-being, to prevent nursing home neglect and abuse, and to improve reporting systems when neglect and abuse do happen. Tragically, the last part is very important—incidents of nursing home abuse and neglect often go unreported, as residents may either be too frail and ill to understand what is happening to them, or may fear retaliation if they report.

Nursing home negligence and abuse is a huge problem in Maryland and across the entire country. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic hit earlier this year, this blog reported on Maryland nursing homes’ negligence and the devastating effects it can have on residents and their families. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has made matters even worse in many nursing homes. A recent news report documented the harsh realities of COVID-19 within nursing homes and how a widespread lack of safety and sanitation protocols has become potentially deadly.

The report discusses one nursing home that received a citation in October of 2019 for failing to “provide and implement an infection prevention and control program.” The report that accompanied the citation found that staff members would engage in shocking behavior—one, for example, used a soiled towel to wipe a resident’s buttocks and then failed to wash their hands before going back to work. In the aftermath of this report, however, residents’ relatives said that the home did not take steps to change their behavior. One woman discusses the care her 93-year-old mother received, saying that she could not rely on the nursing home staff to take care of her or keep her healthy, and witnessed her being injured or roughhoused. Once, she had to clean fecal matter from her mother’s fingernails or dispose of adult diapers left on her bed. Tragically, the woman’s mother passed away in early April from a COVID-19 outbreak that the nursing home failed to control.

The concerns discussed in this home are not unique. In fact, nursing homes across the nation and in Maryland have very similar problems, with substandard living conditions for residents and a lack of proper sanitation. This caused problems before the COVID-19 pandemic, but has worsened since the pandemic spread across the United States in March of this year, causing outbreaks and deaths among nursing home staff and residents.

Recently, an industry news source recorded a fascinating podcast including an interview with a former assistant U.S. attorney who discussed legal issues that could arise for nursing homes from the COVID-19 pandemic. The podcast discusses how nursing home abuse and neglect cases may be affected by the virus. The information is very important for residents of Maryland nursing homes or those who have loved ones in these facilities.

The podcast discussed the various immunity laws passed for health care providers as a result of the pandemic in states across the country. These laws are not brand new—some states have long had immunity provisions that kick in automatically whenever a state of emergency is declared. Most of the current immunity provisions in effect now during the COVID-19 pandemic change the level of culpability that facilities can be held to in nursing home abuse or neglect cases that have to do with the disease.

Typically, someone bringing a nursing home abuse or neglect case has to prove that the actions of the facility amounted to negligence and contributed to resulting injuries, illness, or death. However, the immunity provisions typically increase the standards. According to the podcast speaker, the provisions basically say that nursing home facilities and the individuals working within them will no longer be responsible for negligent behavior. Instead, they can only be held liable at a higher standard, such as gross negligence or reckless disregard. This makes it much harder for victims of nursing home abuse or neglect to hold the facilities responsible, because it’s a higher bar of proof to reach. In other words, it might not be enough to show that the nursing home or employees acted negligently or carelessly and caused the spread of COVID-19 or even a COVID-related death. Instead, potential plaintiffs might have to prove that the nursing home was extremely careless, perhaps even maliciously or willingly, which is much harder to prove as a matter of law.

Recent figures now show that nursing homes make up many of the country’s COVID-19 deaths. In fact, according to a recent report by the New York Times, 43 percent of coronavirus-related deaths in the United States are linked to nursing homes and long-term care facilities. In Maryland specifically, long-term care facilities make up a staggering 60 percent of the state’s COVID-19 deaths.

Throughout the country, COVID-19 deaths in nursing homes and long-term care facilities account for at least 54,000 deaths. So far, many large groups of coronavirus cases have occurred in nursing homes, prisons, and food processing facilities, where social distancing is difficult or impossible. And although there were more cases in prisons and food processing plants, the deadliest clusters have been mostly in nursing homes, where residents are particularly vulnerable because of their age and underlying health problems.

The report found that where large outbreaks occurred in nursing homes, 17 percent of people infected with COVID-19 died, compared to around a five percent death rate among COVID-19 patients in general. In three states, over 75 percent of all COVID-19 deaths are linked to nursing homes and long-term care facilities.

For several years, we have written about Maryland nursing home abuse and neglect cases, which can have tragic consequences for residents and their families. Unfortunately, instead of the situation improving, some reports suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic could be making the situation worse, as thousands of residents are passing away in nursing homes, potentially due to negligent care. Any facility that has a large number of residents living in one community can be dangerous during the pandemic, and more than 37,000 residents in nursing homes have died since early March, raising concerns of inadequate protections or staffing.

Recently, ABC News reported in-depth on the issue. The article detailed the story of seven daughters who decided to move their father, a former corrections officer, into a Maryland nursing home this past February. Unfortunately, within three months of being in the home, their father died after testing positive for COVID-19. But before he died, he was in a severe condition, leading his daughters to believe that inadequate care at the nursing home may have contributed to or even caused his death. One daughter reported that, when her father originally went to the hospital (weeks before he died), the hospital staff told her that her father had lost 30 pounds and that he was so dehydrated “his blood was like mud.”

Typically, when someone is injured due to negligence or abuse in a Maryland nursing home, they have the ability to bring a personal injury lawsuit against the facility to recover for medical expenses, pain and suffering, and more. However, Maryland is one of the several states across the country that has laws in place to protect healthcare providers during a declared public health emergency. Now, during the COVID-19 pandemic and its severe effect within nursing homes, Congress is considering instituting similar protections for nursing homes. This could be a major barrier for plaintiffs who want to bring claims against nursing homes, making these suits an uphill battle. Supporters of the measures claim they protect nursing homes from frivolous claims against them, but critics point to how important it is that families affected by a nursing home’s negligence have an avenue of relief.

Healthcare providers across the United States continue to grapple with challenges related to providing care to patients suffering from COVID-19, otherwise known as the novel coronavirus. Almost 60% of COVID-19 victims in Maryland are long-term care and nursing home residents. In response to the disproportionately high rate of infection in nursing homes, many states, including Maryland, have asked lawmakers to provide nursing facilities with immunity from lawsuits related to their care during the pandemic. Despite the inherent difficulties many residents and their families face pursuing lawsuits against negligent nursing homes, these facilities continue to push for additional protections against liability.

Even though the spread of disease and illness can become challenging to control, these entities have a responsibility to provide their residents and visitors with a safe environment and appropriate treatment. This includes ensuring that their staff is trained in proper hygiene and safety practices, providing staff and residents with protective gear, quickly diagnosing and identifying patients suffering from infectious diseases, and notifying visitors of any changes in visitation protocol. Despite these steps, outbreaks can still occur, and these facilities must have a plan in place to combat these instances. Infection control protocols include implementing stricter sanitation requirements, changing safety equipment requirements, and isolating high-risk or infected residents. The failure to respond to an outbreak effectively can result in deadly consequences for residents and staff.

Many families are beginning to file lawsuits against these facilities for their response to the COVID-19 outbreak. In response, many Maryland nursing home groups are asking the state to provide immunity based on the governor’s emergency declaration. A few states, including Maryland, protect providers during state and national emergencies. Nursing homes are anticipating that many lawsuits will include claims that the facilities did not have enough personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect their staff and residents. However, many residents and families are claiming that a lack of PPE is only one problem of many, and that clinicians and staff failed to diagnose and treat their loved ones quickly.

Despite the concerning rate of COVID-19 (coronavirus) deaths, a recent news report indicates that officials are refusing to provide the public with a comprehensive and accurate list of Maryland nursing homes and long-term facilities where outbreaks have been confirmed. Many nursing home administrators, staff, and residents at these facilities remain in the dark about the presence of the infection at their facilities. Maryland Department of Health officials advised investigators and reporters that public disclosure was up to the local health department. However, many local health departments declined to release the names of affected facilities, reasoning that they need authorization from the state to share the information. This lack of transparency has added to the public’s fear and confusion about how to protect themselves and their loved ones. Maryland nursing homes that fail to engage in appropriate disease prevention practices and do not provide the public with crucial health and safety information may be liable for the spread of disease at their facilities.

Maryland nursing homes and long-term care facilities must limit the spread of disease and infection by taking precautions and acting quickly when an outbreak emerges. It is especially important because nursing home populations are at the highest risk of being affected by COVID-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides these facilities with guidance on how to keep COVID-19 from entering their facilities, identifying infections, preventing the spread of COVID-19, accessing personal protective equipment, and managing severe illnesses.

The guidelines make it clear that one of the most critical components of disease control is providing residents and staff with information about the disease. Staff and residents should receive education and training about signs, symptoms, and potential outbreaks. Further, residents and families should have information about what the facility is doing to protect their loved ones. Some common ways to limit the spread of disease are restricting visitors, reinforcing adherence to infection prevention, and implementing non-punitive, flexible sick policies for staff. These Maryland facilities must act swiftly to implement all of these recommendations before cases are identified at their locations. Maryland nursing homes that fail to engage in these safe practices and refuse to provide this crucial information may leave their residents and staff vulnerable to exposure and severe illness.

There are different causes of action that an individual may be able to bring in a COVID-19 Maryland nursing home case, depending on the circumstances. Causes of action in a Maryland nursing home case can include negligence, wrongful death, battery, false imprisonment and infliction of emotional distress.

Negligence is among the most common causes of action. Generally, in a Maryland negligence claim, a plaintiff must show that a defendant owed the plaintiff a duty, the defendant breached that duty, the plaintiff suffered an injury or loss, and the damages proximately resulted from the defendant’s breach of the duty. In a Maryland nursing home case, a nursing home may be liable for negligence if the home was negligent in caring for the resident, in failing to keep the resident safe, or in another way. For example, failing to segregate a positive COVID-19 resident, to inform other residents, to test symptomatic residents, or to require staff to wear protective gowns and masks might be potential cases of negligence.

Wrongful death claims are another common cause of action in nursing home cases. In the tragic event of the death of a nursing home resident, a nursing home may be liable for the wrongful death of the resident. Wrongful death claims brought under Maryland’s Wrongful Death Act allow claims against a defendant “whose wrongful act causes the death of another.” In COVID-19 cases, these claims would likely be brought for similar reasons as a negligence claim.

As the coronavirus continues to spread across the United States, officials are tracking cases in nursing homes, where residents are at a heightened risk. According to a recent report, state officials have now reported at least 60 Maryland nursing homes and senior living facilities have confirmed coronavirus cases in the state. There have been six deaths at one facility in Mount Airy. Health officials have reported that 147 nursing homes across 27 states have at least one resident with coronavirus, according to one news report.

The Centers for Disease Control and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services looked into the high fatality rate at the Life Care Center nursing home in Kirkland, Washington, where at least 35 residents or staff have died from the virus. CMS found that the center failed to quickly identify and manage sick residents, notify the state’s health department about the rate of respiratory infection among its residents, and failed to have an adequate backup plan when the facility’s primary clinician became sick.

Seniors are at a greater risk because they are more susceptible to complications from the virus, a CMS administrator said in a statement. People over 65 years old are at a high risk of serious illness and death from the virus, according to the CDC. CMS said it would enhance its inspection process for nursing homes in light of its findings.

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